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Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department Presents Pink Patch Project Check to Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center’s Breast Health Fund to Combat Breast Cancer

Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department Presents Pink Patch Project Check to Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center’s Breast Health Fund to Combat Breast Cancer

In an ongoing effort to increase public awareness about the early detection of breast cancer, Los Angeles County Sheriff Department’s (LASD) Chief Laura Lecrivain, on behalf of LA County’s Sheriff Alex Villanueva, presented a $14,000 check to the Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center (PVHMC) Foundation’s Breast Health Fund.

“As a cancer survivor, I know that early detection, prevention, and intervention is the key to success, and we want to encourage and facilitate any which way we can to give all the resources to the community to facilitate treatment,” adds Sheriff Villanueva.

Proceeds were generated through the Pink Patch Project, a collaborative effort between the Los Angeles County Police Chiefs’ Association (LACPCA) and more than 500 public safety agencies throughout the United States. As part of this program, participating agencies sell their commemorative pink patches to public safety personnel and the community. In addition to pink patches, other merchandise, including T-shirts, challenge coins, stuffed animals, and face masks are sold to generate funds. Proceeds from these sales go to fund breast cancer education, research, and treatment.

“We are grateful to the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department and the community’s support of the Pink Patch Project, which funds support services to our breast cancer patients,” said Richard E. Yochum, FACHE, President/CEO of Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center. “We know that a cancer diagnoses changes a person’s life and through this support, we are able to provide our patients comforts such as nurse navigators, support groups, a wig program, creative journaling, and exercise classes. Investments in our cancer program also improves access to advanced diagnostic and treatment therapies.”

“It’s estimated that in 2022, there will be almost 300,000 new breast cancer cases,” said Lori Vanyo, M.D., breast cancer and endocrine surgeon at PVHMC. “We like to see the patients as early as possible so we can tell them they have a number of treatment options available to them. The goal is to get detected early and get treated immediately.”

To purchase pink patches and other merchandise, visit LASD Patch Awareness. Proceeds from the sale of these items will directly benefit cancer research and treatment. Learn more about breast cancer care at PVHMC here.